How to Reduce Plastic Pollution and Waste While Traveling

You’ve read it before I’m sure, get rid of your straws and you’re an eco-friendly traveler. Congratulations, you gave up something to make a difference in the world! But I’ll be honest with you real quick, none of us really need a straw to suck down that wine spritzer we ordered at lunch, in fact, most of us welcome the idea of chugging it like heathens with our gaping mouths – or is that just me? Straws ARE detrimental to the environment, in fact, in the U.S. alone we waste 500 million straws a year, but riding the earth of straws won’t save it. Buying a reusable straw is a great launching point, but if you allow yourself to believe that this is all you need to do to be an eco-friendly person or traveler, you are mistaken. This Earth Month, April 2018, the theme is plastic pollution, so let’s talk about how to reduce your plastic pollution and waste while traveling. Buckle up though, these changes aren’t going to be easy, but you can do it, I know you can!

reduce plastic pollution while traveling

Reducing your plastic pollution and waste goes above and beyond ditching single-use plastics, like straws. Instead, it involves making eco-conscious choices from the moment you choose a destination to what souvenir you choose to bring home. Doing so can have a huge impact on the amount of plastic pollution on our planet. Learn about the harms of plastic, here. I’m not going to lie, making these choices, in the beginning, is quite hard. It took me a while to find a balance between reducing my carbon footprint and still finding a way to enjoy travel. I would stress about it so much I would get anxious about the damage I was adding to the planet, and it wasn’t healthy. I had to completely alter the way I traveled and figure out a system that worked for me, so I could both enjoy traveling and make better choices. I started with straws and water bottles and from there, things became easier. I’ve now reduced my plastic waste by almost 80% in one year alone and I have a system that works for me, so I can still enjoy traveling.

You’re going to have to start making changes that not only affect yourself but also the businesses you buy goods or services from. As tourists and travelers, we travel to many places that rely on tourism to survive. SE Asia, for example, heavily relies on tourism, but this region is also named one of the worst regions for mismanaging plastic waste. Part of the problem is limited local access and money to purchase high-end items made sustainably, lack of resources, economic issues and water quality. I fully understand there are people and countries that can not make these decisions right now, but we, as privileged travelers can. If we can’t change the way we travel to improve the places we visit, then we should not be traveling at all. If we start respecting destinations as much as we do our own homes, happily spend more money to make the right choices, put our money toward eco-tourism, and plan ahead, then we can finally go above and beyond chugging wine spritzers with our mouth to save the planet.

plastic pollution kills sea birds

This guide on how to reduce plastic pollution and waste while traveling is divided into four sections. We will start with preparing for your trip, continue with packing, travel and finish at your destination.

1. PLANNING TO REDUCE PLASTIC POLLUTION WHILE TRAVELING
a. Choosing a Destination
b. Research Hotels, Restaurants and Activities
c. Research Local Recycling Culture
d. Research Local Water Concerns
e. Learn Local Phrases
f. Find Local Brands
2. PACKING TO REDUCE PLASTIC POLLUTION
a. Reduce Plastic in Toiletries
b. Buy Sustainable Clothing
c. Pack Reusable Items
d. Make a List Check it Twice
e. Plan Your Carry-On
3. TRAVELING SUSTAINABLY
a. How to Fly Sustainably
b. Alternatives to Flying
4. REDUCE PLASTIC POLLUTION AT YOUR DESTINATION
a. Ditch the Pool Floaties
b. Shop Smart
c.Buy the Right Food
d. Recycle Your Waste/Pick up Trash
e. Prepare Your Day
f. It’s Ok to Say No

earth month recycle

Ways and How to Reduce Plastic Waste and Pollution While Traveling

1. Planning to Reduce Plastic Pollution While Traveling

I used to not be much of a planner, and to be honest I’m still not much of one. However, over the last few years as I try and move toward a zero waste and sustainable lifestyle I realize how important planning ahead is. So, now I plan simple things. I research accommodation, companies, restaurants and make sure I go to a location prepared and ready to make the right choices. When I don’t plan ahead I find myself wandering the streets of a new city, hungry, thirsty and jetlagged- that is when I buy a bottle of water, or maybe I realize all the ethical tours are booked, so I miss out on a once in a lifetime experience. Planning ahead can really make or break your new sustainable travel habits.

A. Choosing Your Destination

plastic pollution and waste at the beach

You could look at this one of two ways. One you can choose a destination like Kenya or Denmark that have banned plastic bags to help make your travel a little more stress free. Bans on plastic bags mean that you’re not always having to fight the cashier at the store to not bag your items in plastic. When you tell someone you brought your own cup or don’t want a straw- they get it and are more likely to accommodate you. Additionally, you’re giving money to economies that support reducing plastic pollution.

Or you can stick it to the man and travel to destinations, like Thailand, that currently struggle with horrendous amounts of plastic waste. At destinations like this, you can aggressively refuse plastic products and make a display of bringing your own reusable items. Who knows, the more businesses realize their customers don’t want plastic the more they might move to be plastic free.

What do you think? Is it better to support economies that have bans on single use plastics, or make a statment in a country that does not?

B. Research Hotels, Restaurants and Activities

Don’t just book the cheapest hotel and the cheapest excursion. Sit down and do some research about the ethics and sustainability of a company. Email the front desk and ask them what steps they take to reduce their plastic pollution or maintain a green property. Find a hotel that is local, recycles, doesn’t use mini shampoos and sources their products locally. A great example of this business model might be a small local bed and breakfast, or 25Hours Hotel in Germany. They don’t give you bottled water, their gift shop is ALL local handmade oddities, and their shampoo is given in bulk and refilled. Look through photos, do you see plastic in the images? Read the about the company on their website and in reviews. Does the breakfast buffet have single-use plastics? You can find more tips on booking ethical accomodation, here.

25Hours Hotel sustainable hotel.

When it comes to Restaurants, find and save farm to table restaurants that have an ethical businesses model. Do they offer takeout? Is it in plastic? Even if you don’t order takeout giving your money to a company that gives out single-use plastics isn’t ideal. Find local fresh markets you can visit, instead of buying your food at a supermarket with plastic packaging. Is there a package free store in the city? If you star all these great restaurants and fresh markets and use Google Maps offline, at any time you’ll be able to find a sustainable location to eat near you.

If you want to book an excursion, make sure you do your research. If it involves animals, do double the research. You should be looking for businesses practices that align with sustainable methods. Email the tour operator and ask if they give lunch in single-use containers or what types of vehicles they drive. Avoid places like zoos and Seaworld that harm animals, and if you go somewhere like Disney Land or a theme park, make sure you have a game plan to not use their single-use plastics. If you can go to Disney without using plastic – you have reached your A Game. I’m putting that on my bucket list, because I love Disney.

ethical animal tours for sustainable travel

Give your money to a local company that cares about the local environment and is striving to make a difference.

C. Research Local Recycling Culture

Recycle at your destination

I just got back from a month living on a Greek Island called Samos. This island made my skin CRAWL with the terrible single-use plastic consumption. Plastic filled the gutters and ditches. While I made some waves and sparked some conversation with my reusable coffee cup, and lunch box for to-go food, I didn’t see any recycling options on the island. UNTIL one day one of my friends on the island told me about a specific trash bin in a certain area of the city. The island was trying to implement recycling, but the locals hadn’t developed the habit yet. I would have never known there were bins if my friend hadn’t been on the hunt for recycling options and I probably should have done my research beforehand. While my hotel had no bin for recycling I set up my own system in the hotel and took my recycling out once a week to the proper bin.

Moral of the story, do your research before you go. Once you arrive you might not have time to figure out what the system is. It is important to know how and where to recycle while traveling. The easiest option is to book an eco-hotel, but if you can’t do that know what the recycling situation is.

D. Research Local Water Concerns

clean drinking water

Are you traveling to a place where water comes from a pristine glacier or are you headed to a place where even looking at a tomato rinsed in local water will make you sick for days? If the former, just bring a reusable bottle and fill up every day before you head out. If the later, you might want to look at investing in a Life Straw or a bottle with a filter.

Or maybe you will need to prepare to buy bottled water. If this is the case, stop by a supermarket and get the largest container you can and refill a smaller bottle and recycle that.

E. Learn Local Phrases

I might be struggling my way through learning German, but you can rest assured I can order my drink without a straw. Phrases to look up in the local language are “no plastic”, “no bag”, “without straw”, etc. You won’t win every round as a lot of drinks still come out from the bar with a straw, but it helps to have your metal straw handy and show the server you already have one if your translation fails.

F. Find Local Brands

Shop locally

I grew up in Alaska, we have a logo with a bear that says “Made in Alaska.” Here in Germany, we have a thumb giving a thumb up that says, “Kauf Lokal.” Knowing what brands and what signs reflect things that are locally made before you travel will help your brain look for and recognize them when you see them. When you shop local, less plastic and energy is used in transportation, the packaging tends minimal plastic, and you support the local economy.

What is the shop local sign to look for in your country or city?

2. How to Reduce Plastic Waste While Packing

packing to reduce plastic

I would say how and what you pack can be one of the largest deciding factors in how much you cut down your plastic pollution while traveling. If you arrive at your destination prepared with all your reusable items and didn’t forget anything at home you are setting yourself up for success.

A. Reduce Plastic Waste in Your Toiletries

When packing your toiletries plastic is EVERYWHERE. Once you see it, you can’t unsee it. The last thing you should do is head down to your local drug store and buy single-use carry on size minis every time.

Things you can do instead are use bar soap, shampoo, conditioner from a store like Lush, or learn to make your own. You can’t commit to doing this, you can also buy multi-use containers and refill these from bulk.

Get yourself a bamboo tooth and hairbrush.

Find a way to wear your hair natural with a homemade sea salt spray to drop the hairsprays and gels.

Invest in a metal multi-use razor.

If you have not converted already, get a diva cup for your periods. They are a plastic lifesaver and make packing for your period weeks that much easier. You can also invest in Thinx undies instead of pads.

Lush sustainable hygiene products

Quick look at some of my sustainable items. Home made lotion and deodorant in glass jars, bamboo tooth brush & lush bar soaps.

You should be able to look in your toiletry kit and know that for every item of plastic in there, there is an alternative – even toothpaste can be swapped for baking soda. When you’re rid of all the plastic invest in a hardy clear plastic zippered bag for carry-on. You should never use a single use Ziplock bag again!

B. Buy Sustainable Clothing for your Next Trip

hemp seed organic material

Need some last minute outfits for your summer vacation? Do not head to H&M or a similar store. Not only does H&M promote terrible working conditions for women their clothing is cheap. What is wrong with cheap clothing? Well for starters it falls apart quickly and goes out of style even quicker, therefore you have to throw it away not long after you buy it. This creates so much extra waste. However, one of the biggest issues with cheap clothing is the material it is made out of. Did you know that synthetic fabric releases microplastics into the water system every single time you wash your clothing? It doesn’t matter if you’re washing that summer dress in Thailand at a hostel laundry mat or in Denmark you are putting plastic into the water where tiny organisms eat it and thus larger animals eat it and then we eat that…Ah, the circle of life. Buy natural clothing made from hemp, bamboo or cotton. I love the brand Mata Traders or check out these other organic brands with classic looks for traveling. These swimsuits made from old fishing line are fantastic too!

Let’s take a little pause. We, travelers, get a bad rep. How can someone be sustainable and travel so much? It is no secret the airline industry is one of the largest contributors to emissions and has a negative impact on the environment, BUT did you know that the fashion and makeup industry creates MORE greenhouse pollution than the airline industry? That is why one of the biggest lifestyle changes I have made is using less makeup and buying organic clothing – think about all the plastic packing and containers they come in. Think how much energy it costs to make those cheap brands overseas in Indian an then ship them around the world? Find a makeup product that is vegan and has biodegradable packing, shop for clothing that is going to last you and is made from organic material. This is one of the most impactful changes you can make.

C. Pack Reusable Items

Finally, it’s time to talk about straws. I bet you had no idea how much there was to cover before we got to straws. Invest in a full set of reusable items. Things that make every trip with me are my coffee mug, water bottle, straw, utensils, lunch box set, a collapsible cup for to-go cocktails or wine in the park and sometimes I even pack an iced drink option, for when I want ice tea. How on earth do I fit all this in my carry on? Well, I have an Osprey backpack that has two bottle holders on either side, I pack my airplane food in my lunch box and everything else is stuffable.

Reusable travel utensils

A look at my reusables. Water bottle, coffee mug, life straw, metal straw, lunch box and utensil set.

It is just as important to be able to carry these items around during the day. My camera bag has space for my reusable water bottle and room for my straw and utensils. They are of no use to you sitting in the hotel. Coordinate your day bag and your water bottle size to ensure you are prepared for traveling.

Other reusable items I bring along are shopping bags or a stuffable hemp backpack. You can even buy a souvenir bag from your destination to do all your shopping. I always have this bag stuffed in my camera bag in case I want to buy something I need to carry on a whim.

If you plan properly you will never take a plastic fork, buy a water bottle, use a straw, or take food to go in styrofoam ever again. It has been 1.5 years since I bought a plastic water bottle, even while traveling.

D. Make a List and Check it Twice

mak a list

This goes with the above, if you plan properly you can minimize your plastic pollution, but making sure you have everything packed that you need for your trip is critical. Let’s say you forget your headphones – no big deal, right? You can just grab some cheap ones for $10 at the airport. These $10 phones are wrapped in plastic and cheaply made, plus you’ll just toss them when you get home. You see the problem if you forget stuff at home? Make a list and check it twice.

E. Plan Your Carry-On

Did you pack a reusable water bottle, but it is in your large suitcase? Did you pack your headphones, but they’re not easy to get to, so you take some from the arline? All these things just mean you’re taking more from the airline and creating more waste than you need. Make sure you have all your reusable items ready to use on the plane, so that you take nothing from the airline that is wrapped in plastic.

3. Flying and Traveling Sustainably

Impossible, right? Well, mostly, yes. I just admitted that flying is the second most damaging thing to the planet, so the best way to solve this is simply to fly less, but when you have to fly there are ways to cut down your carbon footprint.

A. Fly Sustainably

I understand that is a bit of an oxymoron, so the best title for this is how to fly as sustainable as possible. I wrote a whole post on this topic, and it covers everything from paying the carbon tax to which airplanes are the most energy efficient. You can read it by clicking this link.

B. Choose Alternatives

Train alternative to flying

Instead of spending your long weekend flying from Portugal to Estonia, try looking in your own backyard for destinations reached by train. See if you can book an electric rental car or choose a train that isn’t coal powered – if that is still a thing? A bicycle is a great way to see the city and research what bike rental options there are in each city.

4. Reduce Plastic Pollution at Your Destination

That was a lot of effort and we haven’t even got to our destination yet! Hang in there, we’re just warming up for the grand finale to showcase all your awesome sustainable new swag and lifestyle changes. Ensuring we, as travelers aren’t leaving plastic waste behind for the animals and locals to clean up is essential to saving our planet.

A. Ditch the Pool Floaties


It is time to give up your dream of becoming an Insta famous traveler with unicorn floaties and glitter covering your face. If you think a straw is bad for the planet, think about pool floaties. They are large and made from thick plastic that will be here long after you’re gone. They pop quickly and hotels will have to keep replacing them. The same goes for beach balls, plastic wine glasses for a beach picnic, glitter to make that photo really shine, that amazing ice cream spot that serves in single-use plastic, but everyone is Instagramming. Unfortunately, the Instagram trends are often ones that involve plastic, glitter, and gluttony. Think critically about all your items, do you really need these items, or are they just for a pretty picture?

B. Shop Smart

Are you buying a souvenir wrapped in plastic packaging that was made in China, but you’re in Greece? Think about all the energy it took to get that item to Greece and all the packaging it is wrapped it. Buy souvenirs from local craft workers and tell them you have your own bag. Look for that locally made sticker or sign you researched earlier and you will be shopping local and ethically in no time.

C. Buy the Right Food


farmers market mushrooms

You already starred those fresh markets, so let’s go find some food! Bring your own shopping bag and don’t buy fruits and veggies wrapped in plastic. If you do buy something, like hummus in a plastic container -reuse it as many times as you can on your trip. Think about buying seasonal and food too. Buy what is in season and locally grown at your destination.

D. Recycle and Pick Up Trash

recycle plastic to reduce pollution

You already researched the destination’s recycling habits- now put them to use.

If you’re heading out for a day at the beach, bring an extra shopping bag for trash. It never hurts to collect anything you see at the beach or while hiking and dispose of it in a place where animals can not choke and die.

Talk to your hotel about their recycling habits. Ideally, you’re staying somewhere that recycles, but maybe you notice there is recycling at your destination, but your hotel isn’t implementing it. Ask them to get something set up to make it easier for the guests.

I stayed at a hotel last year that had TONS of single-use plastics for their breakfast. In my review of their property, I reduced their stars and called them out for not recycling and using too much plastic. That wasn’t really on topic was it…?

E. Prepare Your Day

Every day before you head out to explore your new destination make sure you are ready to go. Make a day packing list and check it twice, to ensure you have all your reusables and sustainable activities planned for the day. It is a lot easier to make good choices when you are prepared to do so.

F. It Is Ok To Say No

reusable water bottles to reduce plastic pollution

It is ok to say no. I know, it’s hard. Especially when you’re trying to immerse yourself in local culture and embrace hospitality. If your guide is offering you water, they mean well and are trying to provide excellent customer service. It is ok to say, no thank you and show them your own bottle. Research local customs for polite ways to turn down offers that involve plastic or waste. If you’re in a situation where you can have an intelligent conversation with a local about plastic pollution, do so.

If you’re at a beach party and someone offers to buy you a drink, but you see all the plastic cups littering the beach already, it is ok to say no thank you and get your own drink in your to-go cup. It is ok to say no thank you if the pool asks if they can buy you floaties.

It is also ok to go without. You shouldn’t suck all the joy out of your trip, but deciding not to get an ice tea because you don’t have a to-go cup is an option. It is a hard choice, but it is a choice you have.

This is where I really struggle. I’m ok saying no, but I have yet to find the perfect balance of ensuring I have all the tools I need to not waste and enjoying myself. It’s taking me a while and there have been nights I don’t drink because everything is in plastic cups and there have been nights I use too much plastic because I don’t want to miss out. And there certainly have been nights where bartenders think I am crazy for handing them my own cup. However, every time I travel I do it a little better than I did last time and I’m slowly making sure I don’t miss out, but I don’t waste too much either.

Takeaway

sustainable windmills

Remember plastic pollution is more than just keeping straws off the beach. Plastic pollution is created when plastic is made, whether plastic ends up in the landfill or the ocean, when microplastics are consumed by us and when wildlife die from plastic in the ocean. It is important to make changes at home, but when we travel we tend to have an out of mind out of sight mentality. We need to preserve each and every destination we visit along with our home so we can have a better tomorrow.

I will be the first to admit it is not easy, there are still things I am working on myself, but it will be worth it. This guide covered a lot of things we can do to reduce our plastic waste as we travel, but that doesn’t mean you have to do them all right away. Pick a handful of things you can realistically do on your next trip and every time you travel implement more. I hear so many people saying that one person can’t make a difference, but the amount of plastic pollution you can reduce on your next trip is quite a lot, more than you think. As travelers, it is our job to educate, make decisions that push businesses to sustainable options and leave your destinations cleaner than we when we arrived.

28 thoughts on “How to Reduce Plastic Pollution and Waste While Traveling

  1. Mia

    I really loved this post and how you’re encouraging travelers to be thoughtful about their consumption abroad. Research in advance is everything!

    Reply
  2. Kathi

    Wow, such an in-depth guide – thanks for sharing! What I’m most shocked about is the microplastics from doing your laundry – I never really thought about that before so much (I knew it was the case with Fleece jumpers), but I’ll definitely pay even more attention to the materials of my clothes in the future!

    Reply
  3. Amy Dodd

    Great post! I just did an Instagram series on the Great Barrier Reef and posted facts about plastic in the oceans. Which is awful. I am actually about to head to Thailand and Bali to dive and I have heard nothing but horror stories of plastic on the service at dive spots.
    You list some more great tips and things to do as travelers. I made some changes in my life to more refuseable products and it amazed me how much plastic I was using originally. Sometimes you don’t realize it until you attempt to make the change
    Thank you for the post! It was great.

    Reply
  4. Erin

    Omg thanks for this. I’ve been trying to really reduce my use of plastic this year and it’s so hard here in Argentina! Salesmen actually run after you thinking you forgot to get a straw for your soda or water and think it’s so odd when I tell them it’s a waste of plastic. And when I bring my mesh bags to buy vegetables and fruit they always get so worried about how the bags will stain! I’m so tired of explaining they can be washed hahah *sigh*

    Reply
  5. Cassie

    So useful. The thing I find the hardest is carrying everything. I have a water bottle, cutlery set and want to get a straw next but nothing fits in my bag and I really hate carrying a rucksack! My other issues are that water bottles invariably leak and it’s so hot here in Mexico that I can’t even begin to carry enough water.

    Also, Rwanda banned plastic bags on 2005 when I lived there. It was amazing. They have a monthly day where the entire country stops and cleans, called umuganda, and finally they realised one big issue was plastic bag use. Way ahead of the curve.

    Reply
    1. Wandering ChocoboWandering Chocobo Post author

      Ugh that sounds like you have a lot of barriers. I definitely had to change up the day bag that I use. I have a great camera bag that has a holder on the outside for a water bottle. I fit this great leak-proof SIGG Swiss made bottle, that is super light and thin. This bottle even fits in my normal purse, so when I am out on the town in Munich (my home) I can easily pit it in. I also sometimes carry a backpack and use a camelback. I suggest trying to find a fashionable camera bag or getting a slightly larger purse to fit a bottle. Does Mexico have water re-fill stations out and about? Sadly some of these changes require changes and inconveniences on our part. Good luck sticking with it, sounds like you’re on the right track!

      I love how progressive certain countries in Africa are when it comes to plastics!

      Reply
      1. Cassie

        I have an amazing backpack that I love. I just need to get over myself. I am so enjoying not having to carry a rucksack of kid crap, that’s the main issue for me to overcome. As I said I do have everything ready and do sometimes use it. Just need to be consistent. Haven’t had a sigg bottle for years, interesting idea.

        And no, not too many water stations…some but not many. We do take water out with us on day trips but just general day to day we forget sometimes.

        Reply
  6. Olivia

    These are all great tips! I once read a book by Sylvia Earle (an awesome oceanographer with National Geographic) who described her dives in detail every time she saw trash. She said something along the lines of our generation will be known for its plastic.
    I hope, too, that we can make significant changes and reduce our impact on this planet.

    Reply
  7. Lorial Roballo

    Really, really, really, great post!! I am currently doing a zero-waste challenge so this naturally article caught my eye. Thanks for this awesome article. I like the tip about calling ahead to the hotels and asking about recycling. That’s definitely an important factor for me!

    Reply
  8. Anna

    Such a useful post! I’m a bit of a greenie myself as well but you have taken it to a whole new level. Definitely will be putting these tips to use. In Thai, no plastic bag, please is “mai aow thung, kha” and if you don’t want a straw it’s “mai aow loot duut, kha”. Men use the polite particle krab and ladies kha at the end of a sentence.

    Reply
  9. Emily

    This is such a thorough list, I LOVE it! I’m incorporating a lot of this into my travels and getting better about it every day. Thanks so much for speaking up about this issue! It’s really exciting to see travel bloggers taking a lead on this – hopefully other travelers will follow suit!

    Reply
  10. Mags Nixon

    Wow wow wow – amazing post! I’ll be pinning and sharing on facebook. You’ve really given me food for thought and taken reduction of plastics to a whole new (doeable) level for us. Thank you

    Reply
  11. Sol Solntze

    What a thoughtful and very practical post, and I think the fact that you can give examples of what you have done in certain situations, and in what ways it is hard is also very helpful. To be honest, a lot of this is good for people who are not travelling – I need to overhaul my day tripping bag for sure.

    Reply
  12. Dada

    Ohh we all should do exactly what you have written here traveler or not! I wish I could say I am a good sustainable traveler! I try but I guess I dont try enough! I have to do more effort both when I travel and at home. I could do better on researching on the destination for an exemple, and stop buying water from a plastic bottle! Thats the easiet but I dont understand why I keep doing it! You post really reminds me of how important this issue is and that we need to take it more seriously!

    Reply
  13. Deeptha

    Excellent article, Sussana. Research is the key and travellers like us can implement many little changes all of them adding up to reduce plastic pollution in places we travel to. My backpack and travel bag both have a set of resuable items – water bottle, a small lunch box with cutlery etc. I hope to make more significant changes in the way I travel to help reduce plastic pollution.

    Reply
  14. Chloé Arnold

    SUCH an important post!!! We traveled through Asia a bunch and it was heartbreaking to see the pollution from tourists everywhere. We really do need to be so intentional about reducing our pollution.

    Reply
  15. Medha Verma

    Although I think the first point, about picking up a destination that has banned plastics, is quite unrealistic, I agree with the rest of your points. Especially about taking care of what you pack, that is very much in our hands and easily doable! Also, its a good point about not using these large colourful floats as they might look good and seem like fun but they’re a major source of plastic pollution in the environment, especially in the water.

    Reply
  16. Leah

    Great job on this, I think this is the most detailed guide I’ve seen on reducing pollution and waste while traveling! I for one definitely need to be a little more conscious of these things, especially in the process of planning ahead for a trip. I honestly thought it would be harder to make a difference, but these tips seem very easy to implement! Thanks again 🙂

    Reply
  17. YUKTI Agrawal

    Great tips on sustainability and reducing plastic waste during traveling. I prefer to carry reusable plates and spoons during road travel. I try to carry water bottle which I refill when empty. To reduce plastic from our lives is very important. Thanks for sharing awareness creating post.

    Reply
  18. Blair villanueva

    The garbage worldwide is really disgusting and i am glad that we were taught how to reuse and recycle at the early of our childhood. Having an Asian mom helps, I mean she always yell on us each time we are caught not using it properly, until we grew up to have that notion like she is always behind our back, hahhaa. Its funny but helps a lot. Now it became our habit to reuse and recycle, and chopstick is always in our bags.

    Reply
  19. Ami Bhat

    That is quite an Elaborate post. And a very good one too. It could get overwhelming to start all at once but a few small tips from these would be a good beginning. Love the passion with which you have written

    Reply
  20. Anshula

    I love this post so, so much! I wish I read this earlier when I first got on the responsible travel train a year ago. So far, I’ve been doing most of the things on this list (yay) but wearing sustainable clothing is still something I struggle with every day. I had no idea that the fashion and makeup industry creates more greenhouse pollution than the airline industry. That fact shook me a little. I’ll definitely try to look out for more organic clothing.

    Reply
  21. Kavita Favelle

    This is a really helpful post, and full of practical ideas to be part of a solution. We went to Thailand for the first time in January and were shocked at the level of plastic use and waste, it’s clearly a huge issue. Another place we have struggled, though we adore the country, is Japan, where there seems to be an excessive use of plastic packaging for food, way beyond what we have at home in England (which is already much too much).

    Reply
  22. Punita Malhotra

    I had no idea that synthetic fabric releases microplastics into the water system when they are washed. There are so many things we are doing wrong on so many levels. I think the first step for us all to spread the word. Ps. We buy a lot of natural, organic clothing locally made here in India.

    Reply
  23. Marcelle

    We’ve been in many places mainly in Africa which were dumps and people lived on it. But the “western world” is much more of a problem, although the pollution is sometimes not visible. We still have to go a far way to make people aware of the problem. Your guide is great and I’m happy to take your advice and share it!

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